Businesses reminded to check guidance on advertising signs

Published Date: 

17 Jun 2019 - 12:00
Advertising boards

Businesses across Argyll and Bute are being reminded to check whether they need permission to put up advertising signs.

Argyll and Bute Council has guidelines which give clear advice to local firms and residents.

People planning to install new or replacement signs are being urged to check with the council before going ahead.

Policy Lead for Planning and Regulatory Services, Councillor David Kinniburgh, said: “Signage, whether it’s on a building or an A board on the street, comes under the control of the council.

“While some types of signage may not need permission, in many cases businesses will need to apply for planning consent or pavement licences before going ahead.

“Our guidance gives clear, straightforward advice on the circumstances in which permission is needed, and what’s required when making an application.

“The policy aims to ensure advertising is appropriate, in the right location and has a positive impact on the area.”

The signage policy can be viewed by logging on to the council website.

Some concerns have been raised about a growing number of A boards in town centres and whether these impact on safety, accessibility of town centres, and look of the centres, particularly where there are duplicate and unnecessary signs.

A recent survey by Guide Dogs showed that 97% of people with a vision impairment have problems with street clutter, such as A-Boards, which are littered across the pavement.

A clearer high street, where obstacles like A-boards are placed consistently, leaving plenty of room for pedestrians to walk past, not only makes it a safer place for those who suffer from sight loss, families with young children or people with mobility difficulties, but also a nicer, more inviting place for all shoppers.

Councillor Kinniburgh added: “The council can take enforcement action but this would be a last resort in cases where signs have a detrimental impact on road safety or pedestrian access, or have a significant adverse impact on the character or appearance of an area.

“I would urge businesses to check our updated guidelines to keep themselves on the right side of the regulations.”