Library Publications

Deserted Settlements of Glassary Parish: a journal of personal observation by Allan Begg

Some of the ruined crofts, farms and dwellings in Glassary Parish with names of people who once inhabited them

Like its companion volume, Deserted Settlements of Kilmartin Parish, this book about Glassary Parish is published with the simple intention of making available the valuable research undertaken by Allan Begg.

The book combines academic research with recollections, observations and local traditions, making a unique work of reference as well as a remarkably enjoyable book to read.  It will appeal to social historians, researchers and genealogists alike.  As with the companion volume on Kilmartin Parish, most of the people listed in the book are now remembered only in various records and gravestones of the 18th and 19th centuries, but it is they who tilled the land, made roads, built houses and dykes, drained the land and planted woodland, creating a great deal of what we have today.

Argyll and Bute Library Service gratefully acknowledges the financial assistance given to this publication by the Natural History and Antiquarian Society of Mid Argyll.

Available from all branch libraries or by post from Library Headquarters

Price £15  (+p&p)   ISBN 1 903041 04 X

 

 

Deserted Settlements of Kilmartin Parish: a journal of personal observation by Allan Begg

The ruined castles, crofts, farms and dwellings in Kilmartin Parish with names of people who once inhabited them

This volume is published with the simple intention of making available the very valuable researches undertaken by Allan Begg.  Within this book he has gathered together an invaluable store of information on places now often barely remembered by the modern population.

To these academic researches, he has added his own recollections, observations and the traditions which he has heard.  The result is both a work of reference and a remarkably friendly book to read, written very much in a style which carries with it the cadences and flavour of the man and the locality.  It will be of enormous interest to those who may wander through this beautiful landscape in years to come.  It will be of special interest to those who trace their ancestry to this land.

Argyll and Bute Library Service gratefully acknowledges the financial assistance given towards this publication by the Natural History and Antiquarian Society of Mid Argyll.

Available at all branch libraries or by post from Library Headquarters

Price  £15 (+p&p)   ISBN 1 903041 00 7

 

 

Letters by the Packet  edited with an introduction and notes by Marion Campbell

Argyll and Bute Library Service has published a fascinating collection of correspondence between members of the Campbell family in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Argyll and Bute Library Service has published a fascinating collection of correspondence between members of the Campbell family in the 18th and 19th centuries.  The idea of publishing the letters was conceived by the late Marion Campbell of Kilberry and is the result of painstaking research and meticulous attention to detail in reading and, in some cases, deciphering the original letters. 

At the end of the 17th century, migration to the West Indies was an attractive proposition and the first part of the book reveals letters written between 1728 and 1826 from Campbell settlers in Jamaica to family members in Argyll, via the Steam Packet Company, giving a rare insight into the social issues and attitudes of that time.  Part 2 moves on to another generation who followed the route of many others seeking their fortune in Canada and Australia in the 19th century, and once again portrays a glimpse of relationships and values as seen through the eyes of one family.

This book is a treasure trove of information for social historians and Campbell descendants alike.  Marion Campbell has included detailed notes to accompany the letters giving the background to the writers and their relationships to other family members, as well as providing historical information to put the personal correspondence into context.

Available at all branch libraries or by post from Library Headquarters

Price £8.50 (+ p&p)      ISBN 1 903041 07 4

 

 

The Mull Diaries

James Robertson was Sheriff Substitute of North Argyll between 1842 and 1846.  Based at Tobermory, he kept a concise record of his stay in a series of diaries which have been carefully transcribed and edited by Joseph Buist Loudon.

James Robertson was Sheriff Substitute of North Argyll between 1842 and 1846.  Based at Tobermory, he kept a concise record of his stay in a series of diaries which have been carefully transcribed and edited by Joseph Buist Loudon.  With their incisive insights into people and events, the diaries have much to offer the historian and enthusiast.  By illuminating people, manners and preconceptions of the time, they shed light on social history.  Local lairds stride through the pages and emigrant ships anchor in the bay.

The Sheriff Substitute was clearly a sociable man, not averse to 'crack and dram' with Highland folk, though often lamenting lack of congenial company.  He also had a keen sense of humour as his dry account of a thoroughly wet tourist excursion to Iona makes clear.  Whether relating serious issues, such as the problems of the would-be emigrants, or making almost inconsequential arrangements to retrieve a night shirt and cap from an Oban hotel, James Robertson allows us a possibly unique insight into his own working life and, through his eyes, into life on the island in the mid 19th century.

Available at all branch libraries or by post  from Library Headquarters

Price  £14  (+p&p)